Horseradish, Kielbasa, and Sauerkraut in Argentina

Today was a good day… no, a great day.  I had a roast beef sandwich with horseradish.  That may not sound like a big deal to most people, and it really isn’t, but it was huge for me.  I love horseradish on a roast beef sandwich, but I have not been able to find it in Argentina.  I have been to Jewish delis, specialty food markets, Chinatown, etc, etc.  If you put all the hours together that I have spent looking for horseradish, it would probably add up to several days worth of fruitless shopping.  I have spent many more hours looking for other things…  BTW, horseradish in Argentina is called “Rabano Picante”.  Rabano is radish, and picante is spicy or “hot”.

Here’s how it went down… Continue reading

Gran Parilla del Plata – If it’s good enough for Michelle Obama, it’s good enough for you

Where to eat in San Telmo?

On the corner of Peru and Chile in the neighborhood of San Telmo, in Buenos Aires, is a restaurant named Gran Parilla del Plata.  I’ve mentioned before that we are living in San Telmo, and this restaurant is right down the block from us. I can also tell you that it is worth going to.

TLDR: The steaks are delicious and enormous, and the price is reasonable – give it a try.  AND please excuse the pictures, they aren’t very sharp! Continue reading

Gibraltar Bar

I love fish and chips. I love good beer.

I really love both of them together, so it was with hope that we headed to Gibraltar Bar just off Av. Independencia and Peru in San Telmo.

The place is really easy to find, and upon entering, looks like your typical English pub. They have a nice wood bar, pool table in the back room and a patio out back for the smokers. Continue reading

Peruvian Cheese Bread – Pan de Yuca

Pan de Yuca is always a tasty treat and my family loves this bread.  It’s also super easy to make.  I called it Peruvian, but there is a variation in every country in South America.  It is called Chipas in Argentina and Paraguay, Pan de Queso in Columbia, and Cuñape in Bolivia.  You get the idea!

In Peru, Pan de Yuca is served with yogurt (which is delicious), but it is good with a spicy jam as well, but by itself, fresh out of the oven, it is amazing.

I won’t call this bread healthy, but it is a gluten free bread.  Pan de Yuca is best when it is freshly baked, but one option is to freeze the dough and just take out as many as you want to bake when you are ready for a delicious treat.

One note:  It may seem like there is a LOT of cheese, and you can feel free to adjust up and down, but I like the ratio as stated in the recipe.

Peruvian Cheese Bread

Peruvian Cheese Bread


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Peruvian Cheese Bread - Pan de Yuca
Peruvian Cheese Bread, or Pan de Yuca is a delicious little treat any time! Gluten free and made with Tapioca flour.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
rolls
Ingredients
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Servings
rolls
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350f/177C.
  2. Combine all dry ingredients is a bowl.
  3. Add butter, cheese, milk, eggs, and mix until smooth.
  4. Divide and roll into small balls about the size of a golf ball
  5. If you like, you can freeze the dough at this point to bake at a later time.
  6. Place on a non-stick baking sheet about 2 inches apart.
  7. Bake for 20 minutes, or until the tops of the rolls begin to turn golden.
Recipe Notes

As mentioned above, you can add or remove the amount of cheese, and you may need to add a touch more milk or water.

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Chan Chan – Peruvian food in Buenos Aires

Peruvian cuisine is a fusion of many different culinary traditions: Andean, Spanish, and Asian among the most influential.  Potatoes are popular, as are beans, corn, fish, meat, etc.  Peruvian food is very popular in Buenos Aires and a Peruvian restaurant is easy to find in nearly every neighborhood.  I know of several in San Telmo, and Monserrat, but there is one in particular I wanted to tell you about… Continue reading

Seco de Carne (Peruvian Beef Stew)

I first had Seco de Carne at the Peruvian restaurant Chan Chan in Buenos Aires.  It is a very typical Peruvian dish, aromatic, tasty, and perfect for a colder day.

There are also many variations and recipes.  Some put potatoes in the stew, some sweet potatoes.  Sometimes the meat is beef, sometimes pork, or even goat (which is quite tasty).

In this recipe, I marinate the meat in beer, but you can also just use water and skip the marinade.  If so, I  would recommend adding a cup of bullion.

Peruvian Stew

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Print Recipe
Seco de Carne (Peruvian Beef Stew)
Seco de Carne is a delicious Peruvian stew that is wonderful on a cold winters day.
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 2 hours
Passive Time 1 hour
Servings
people
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Cut the beef into large cubes and place into a bowl. Add cumin, salt, and 3 cups of stout beer. Mix and marinate for at least one hour or in the refrigerator overnight.
  2. Add cilantro (keep a bit aside to garnish) and one cup of water to a blender, and blend until smooth.
  3. Heat oil and brown beef on all sides reserving the marinade, transfer to a bowl then cook the onions, garlic, and aji amarillo paste until the onions are soft.
  4. Add the marinade, meat, any juices, and the cilantro puree.
  5. Add enough water to cover the meat, bring to a simmer on medium low heat. Cook for 90 minutes or until the meat is tender.
  6. Add the carrots and peas, and cook until the vegetables are tender.
  7. Garnish with cilantro.
Recipe Notes

Serve with white rice, and beans.

What are some of your favorite variations?

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